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We invite sociology students to participate in a group study program that will take place in Mexico during the spring semester of 2019. The program will include two courses at both the senior undergraduate and graduate level: Social Issues in Mexico, and Inter-Cultural Practice: Collaboration for Social Justice. Students will spend about two weeks in Mexico City, and about one week in a rural area in the State of Puebla.

Dr. Amal Madibbo, CBC French radio, CBC French radio interviews Dr. Madibbo about her recent Award of Recognition

The Embassy of Sudan in Canada has offered Dr. Amal Madibbo an Award of Recognition on Sept 1, 2018 in Ottawa. It is in appreciation of her academic contributions to Sudan and fostering relations between the University of Calgary and universities in Sudan. 

Dr. Pallavi Banerjee was invited to participate in an 'by invitation only pre-ASA symposium' by the Council on Contemporary Families called Gender Matters.
Only 10 pieces were accepted for this symposium. To read the briefing paper prepared by Pallavi Banerjee, University of Calgary, for the Council on Contemporary Families, please visit the link below.

Dr. George Kurian (1928-2018)

Professor Emeritus, University of Calgary

              George began life with ten siblings on a plantation in India owned by his father. He was encouraged by his family to further his education and attended the University of Bombay where he graduated in 1950 with a Bachelor of Arts, Economics, History, Political Science, English and Malayalam Language. After graduation, George took a trip to London, where he met some students from the Hague who encouraged him to apply to the Institute of Social Studies. He did so and was admitted in 1953 and went on to obtain a Master of Arts degrees: Sociology and Economics, in 1955 and a Master of Social Sciences in Sociology (1956).  After returning to India and rather than manage the agricultural properties in Kerala State, he returned to Europe in 1958 to obtain his PhD in Sociology at the State University of Utrecht, Utrecht, Netherlands in 1961.  His dissertation, The Indian Family in Transition: A Case Study of Kerala Syrian Christians, was internationally recognized and was published that same year by Mouton & Co.

             After completing his doctoral program, Dr. Kurian returned to India and took a position at an Agricultural college, Hyderabad in the Rural Sociology Department.  In 1963, Dr. Kurian took a position as Lecturer and Acting Head in the Department of Asian Studies at Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand.  He was also attached to the Centre for Asian Studies.  After three years of teaching at Victoria University, Dr. Kurian moved to Canada and became an assistant professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of Calgary. He remained at the University of Calgary for the remainder of his career although he was a visiting professor at the University of Kerala in 1980.  He was named professor in 1976 and was given the title of Emeritus Professor when he retired in 1995.

Dr. Jean E. Wallace, PhD, is a professor in the Department of Sociology, Faculty of Arts and a co-principal investigator with Carr on this study. Carr and Wallace met more than two years ago when they collaborated to create a graduate level course in mixed methods research at UCalgary. Wallace was studying job stress, coping and mental health of veterinarians at the time, and the two immediately found parallels in their shared interest of human-animal bonds and coping with chronic pain.

“We know that living with chronic pain can lead to depression but also if you’re depressed, you’re going to view the experience of living with chronic pain with a more negative light as well,” says Wallace. “Even if we can’t reduce the pain, if we can reduce depression and improve mental health, there are benefits in terms of looking at how you get up in morning and want to do things. Some people we interviewed were suicidal; they were thinking about taking their own lives but what stopped them was having a dog and having to care for that creature. Having a dog is so central to giving them a meaning and purpose.”

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