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Submitted by admin on Wed, 11/21/2007 - 3:47pm

  

The Department of Sociology at the University of Calgary is among the top rated research

oriented departments in the country. Our programs at all levels emphasize core knowledge

in classical and contemporary social theories, social statistics and diverse sociological methods.

In addition, the faculty has a wide range of substantive interests.

Around the Department

Canadian legal historians will convene in over two days this July. Canada’s Legal Past: Future Directions in Canadian Legal History will feature historians from across Canada and around the world in an exploration of the new approaches to Canadian legal history. The conference, hosted by the faculties of Arts and Law, will feature both established and emerging scholars.

The conference was conceived by Lyndsay Campbell (History and Law) and Ted McCoy (Sociology) who hope to create an opportunity for reflection on the eve of Canada’s sesquicentennial. The conference will forge links among institutions and across linguistic, historiographical and disciplinary divides, in order to rethink assumptions and develop new questions and directions. Bilingual panels will include new research on children and the family, First Nations and Indigenous law, Confederation, Crime and Punishment, Sexuality, and Race. 

Trans-Pacific Mobilities: The Chinese and Canada 

Edited by Lloyd L. Wong

This volume offers fresh insights into historical and contemporary Chinese mobilities and issues of transnationalism.

Dr. Liang Wang is an Associate Professor of Sociology, in the Department of Public Administration, at Guangzhou University, China, and she is a visiting scholar in our department for 2017. 

Our congratulations go out to the following graduates of Fall 2016 Convocation: Monetta Bailey (Ph.D.), Christopher Esselmont (Ph.D.), Lorena Kembel (M.A.), Ana Litviniuc (Ph.D.), Nilima Sonpal-Valias (Ph.D.) and Laurent Wall (M.A.)

In the Media

In an article titled “Chinese techno-immigrants in Western Canada,” two sociologists describe how U.S. corporations, including Microsoft, have opened high-tech arms in Metro Vancouver to capitalize on Canada’s less-restrictive approach to migration.

“High-tech computer programming and computer systems analysis have been the two most common intended occupations of all skilled immigrants to Canada, most of whom come from Asia,” write SFU’s Karl Froschauer and the University of Calgary’s Lloyd Wong.

The university has conducted two scientific studies in co-ordination with TUCFA on the gender gap in academic salaries, the first in 2004 and the second in 2011. Data on all full-time academic employees (not sessional instructors) was obtained from Human Resources, following the appropriate confidentiality protocols. The first study was conducted by Dr. Jean Wallace and the second by Dr. Jenny Godley, both faculty members in the Department of Sociology.